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Thursday, August 6, 2020 | History

3 edition of Zones and planes of weakness in rocks and slope stability found in the catalog.

Zones and planes of weakness in rocks and slope stability

N. I. KomarnitНЎskiД­

Zones and planes of weakness in rocks and slope stability

by N. I. KomarnitНЎskiД­

  • 247 Want to read
  • 4 Currently reading

Published by Consultants Bureau in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Rock slopes.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby N. I. Komarnit͡skiĭ.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsTA710 .K5853
    The Physical Object
    Paginationviii, 108 p.
    Number of Pages108
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5610238M
    LC Control Number68017841

    Another factor influencing shear strength are planes of weakness in sedimentary rocks. Bedding planes (see Chapter 5) can act as significant planes of weakness when they are parallel to the slope but less so if they are perpendicular to the slope [ 1 ]. locations A and B, the bedding is nearly perpendicular to the slope and relatively stable. Interbedded sedimentary rocks: Extremely variable, depending upon rock type, climate and bedding thickness as well as joint orientations and seepage conditions. Along river valleys, natural excavation may have reduced stresses sufficiently to permit lateral movement along bedding planes and produce bedding plane mylonite shear zones.

    -rapid downslope movement of rock or soil(not necessarily as a coherent mass) described collectively as landslides ZONES OF WEAKNESS: slip planes, natural breaks in consistency of materials (such as bedding planes in sedimentary rock) saturates soil causing soil slops and debris flow; erodes base of slope to decrease stability; can.   Figure shows a block of rock situated on a rock slope. The block is being pulled toward Earth’s centre (vertically down) by gravity. We can split the vertical gravitational force into two components relative to the slope: one pushing the block down the slope (the shear force), and the other pushing into the slope (the normal force).The shear force, which wants to push the block down the.

    planes of weakness The weathering of igneous rocks such as granite, does not generally create distinct planes of weakness, so that this is quite a different situation to that just described above. The soil profile consists of zones of partly weathered material containing remnants of the parent rock, and zones of fully weathered material (soil). Falls: involve the free fall of material (usually rock) from a cliff face 2. Slides: Blocks of rock or soil move along a zone or plane of weakness (bedding planes, foliation planes, fracture surfaces, etc.) -Material often stays together in a coherent mass as it moves downslope, but .


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Zones and planes of weakness in rocks and slope stability by N. I. KomarnitНЎskiД­ Download PDF EPUB FB2

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Komarnit︠s︡kiĭ, N.I. Zones and planes of weakness in rocks and slope stability. New York, Consultants Bureau,   Figure Relative stability of slopes as a function of the orientation of weaknesses (in this case bedding planes) relative to the slope orientations.

[SE] Internal variations in the composition and structure of rocks can significantly affect their : Steven Earle. Rock Slope Stability Charles A Kliche. Whether you're involved in surface mine design, surface mine production, construction, education, or regulation, this is an important book for your library.

planes aquifer toppling slope face displacement slopes drawdown hydraulic bolt You can write a book review. Factors affecting slope stability. Slope stability is affected by the following factors. Strength of soil and rock. Type of soil and stratification.

Discontinuities and planes of weakness. Groundwater table and seepage through the slope. External loading. Geometry of the slope. Causes of slope failure. Following are different causes of slope.

Anorthosite which showed a good rock quality was distributed in the lower part of the weakness zone. It is found that the fracture zone, the clayey layers and the hydrothermal alteration zone of anorthosite might adversely affect the slope stability.

Boring cores showing the lithologic boundary are presented in Fig. by: 2. Figure Stability-controlling major weakness in the rock slope Rock Mechanics on a Geological Base We assume - correctly as it turned out - that a 3rd order zone below the street with a dip of about 70 ~ to the east, controls the stability of the entire rock slope.

Rock strength varies widely and is determined by internal planes of weakness and their orientation with respect to the slope. In general, the more water contained by the slope material, the greater the likelihood of failure. This is especially true for unconsolidated sediments, where excess water pushes against the grains.

Explain how slope stability is related to slope angle Summarize some of the factors that influence the strength of materials on slopes, including the type of rock, the presence and orientation of planes of weakness such as bedding planes or fractures, the type of unconsolidated material upon the slope, and the effects of water flowing upon or.

Weakness zone is a part or zone in the ground in which the mechanical properties are significantly lower than those of the surrounding rock mass. Weakness zones can be fault zones, shear zones, thrust zones, weak rock or mineral layers, etc. Gouge. is clay-like material occurring between the walls of a fault as a result of the move ments along.

Weak zones can be especially hazardous if the zone or plane of weakness intersects or parallels the slope of a hill or mountain What are bedding planes. Zones of weakness for slip planes that include fractures in all rock type and surfaces between layers in sedimentary rocks. Fig. plots the Mohr–Coulomb failure envelope and the Mohr circle representation of the rock containing a set of parallel planes of weakness.

The shear failure angle (β w) in the shear failure plane of the rock can be obtained from the Mohr circle, i.e., β w = 45°+ φ w /2. Compared to Eq. Slope Stability Course No: G Credit: 6 PDH Yun Zhou, PhD, PE be analyzed as an infinite slope. The failure plane for this case is parallel to the surface of A typical section or “slice” through the potential failure zone of a slope in a dry cohesionless soil, e.g., dry sand, is shown in Figurealong with its free body.

Q-slope is an empirical rock slope engineering method for assessing the stability of excavated rock slopes in the field. Intended for use in reinforcement-free road or railway cuttings or in.

in Sedimentary Rocks BEDDING PLANES weakness in sedimentary rocks, and masses of rock can move along them causing rock slides.

Since over 75 percent of the earth’s slope stability problems. In the study of the seepage characteristics of layered rock slope under rainfall conditions, the majority of previous research has considered the hydraulic conduction to be isotropic, or only considered the anisotropy ratio of the hydraulic conductivity, ignoring the anisotropy angle.

In the current study, a layered rock slope in the Pulang region was selected as an example. Then, based on the.

Fractures, metamorphic foliation, or bedding can significantly reduce the strength of a body of rock, and in the context of mass wasting, this is most critical if the planes of weakness are parallel to the slope and least critical if they are perpendicular to the slope.

This is illustrated in Figure rock faces with slopes in 58 increments. As an alternative to computer drafting, Fig. 3 could be used as a set of reference curves: that is, the appropriate curves could be traced to obtain the daylight envelope required for slope stability analysis.

REFERENCES Bell, F.G. Ground engineer’s reference book. Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann. Slope Failure is the movement of mass on slope (falls, slides, flows) Landslide: involves an extensive area, mild slope (Slope Failure: limited area, steep slope, movement is fast (sometimes with no signs) The stability of a slope should be evaluated when slope movement due to additional.

SLOPE STABILITY 1. Purpose. This engineer manual (EM) provides guidance for analyzing the static stability of slopes of earth and rock-fill dams, slopes of other types of embankments, excavated slopes, and natural slopes in soil and soft rock. Methods for analysis of slope stability are described and are illustrated by examples in the appendixes.

tion of the rock segments that will form the slope. Rock segment i.s the in-situ piece of rock that becomes the rockfall when it falls out of the slope. Knowledge of the struc­ ture of the rock is needed to define the attitudes and spacings of the planes that cut the rock within and at the surface of the slope and form the roclt segments.

slurry of soil, rocks, and organic material (collectively called de- Factors Affecting Slope Stability Undisturbed, steep mountain slopes have adjusted to the joint and fracture planes are ready-made zones of weakness that 10 • Dipping bedding surfaces Parallel (less stable) Perpendicular.Foliation Planes - During metamorphism of rock, differential stress causes sheet silicate minerals, like clay minerals, biotite, and muscovite, to grow with their sheets parallel to one one another, This results in the rock having a foliation or schistosity Because the sheet silicates can break easily parallel to their sheet structure, the.Boundaries of Rock Mechanics.

Recent Advances and Challenges for the 21st Century contains papers from the International Young Scholars Symposium on Rock Mechanics (Beijing, China, 28 April-2 May ). The symposium was organized by the ISRM Commission on Education, and sponsored by the International Society for Rock Mechanics (ISRM) and.